Plant a pollinator garden to supply immediate food in response to freeze setback

Pollinators are beginning to visit The Gardens at Texas A&M University. (Texas A&M AgriLife photo by Laura McKenzie)

Plant a pollinator garden to supply immediate food in response to freeze setback

Pollinators are in need of help as freeze-damaged plants recover from Winter Storm Uri

Pollinators serve a great purpose in helping pollinate plants and vegetables alike during many months of the year. Although wildflowers returned post-freeze, and many plants are beginning to show life again, most flowering was set back several weeks meaning food sources for pollinators are not available. Planting a few alreadyflowering plants or fast-growing seeds in your pollinator garden will help them get through while other plants recover.

Michael Arnold, Ph.D., director of The Gardens at Texas A&M University and professor of landscape horticulture for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, walks us through what we can do immediately to help pollinators and what steps we can take to set them up for long-term success and yearround support.

Pollinators include butterflies and bees, but also birds, bats, moths and small animals who obtain nectar and pollen from flowers, trees and woody shrubs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Texas Mohair Weekly Rocksprings Record

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